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Is there a difference between recruitment and sourcing?

In the past, the term “recruiting” was used to refer to the whole hiring process. In more recent years, sourcing and recruitment have been divided into two more distinct disciplines in a number of firms.

Recruiting

 Simplest terms, recruiting refers to the process of filling open positions with Selected Organizations.

For the number of companies, this is the point where the sourcing gives the recruiter the qualified applicant. The hiring manager and candidates are guided by the recruiter as they go through the screening, selection, and hiring process. This include talks over the phone, gatherings, and interviews.

There are two types of recruiters:

 

in-house recruiters who are paid employees of the employing firm and third-party or agency recruiters who are employed by a company that does recruitment on the client company’s behalf.

The recruiter often takes care of administrative tasks including advertising vacancies, organising interviews, making official job offers, etc. The recruiter’s responsibility is to see the process through to completion and ensure that the corporate post is really filled. In some circumstances, the recruiter also aids in the on-boarding process.

Sourcing / Researching 

 

Sourcing or research is one of the early steps of the recruiting process.

 

Candidates who are qualified for the current job vacancies are found by researchers. A source’s main responsibility is to carry out in-depth research within the field and prepare a list of the top applicants for a certain post.

 

To carry out their task, researchers use job boards, specialist websites, professional social networks like LinkedIn, social media recruitment, rival employee research, and Google resume searches.

Why the confusion, then?

The allied profession of sourcing is still relatively young. Teams that specialise in talent acquisition add new components to the process as they develop, which increases complexity while also improving results. It is now possible to establish, engage, and value prospects thanks to specialised technology.

 

It gets harder for one individual to grasp them all when these technologies are included into the recruiting process, which promotes the “sources recruiter” expertise.

 

Since many individuals are unfamiliar with this new specialty, they mistakenly refer to everyone active in hiring new employees as a recruiter. Even though the two positions are mutually beneficial, they are not interchangeable.